News

Calling Volunteers for a Unique Opportunity: Quality Checks for Birdsong Recordings

Jefferson Land Trust is now seeking volunteers to assist with an innovative bird monitoring study we recently launched on several of our nature preserves. Assessing the presence of certain indicator bird species will help us determine whether our forest management activities are succeeding in creating the habitat conditions that birds and other local wildlife need […]

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Jefferson Land Trust Awarded Cornell Grant for New Bird Monitoring Study

This summer, with the support of a $25,000 Cornell University grant and in collaboration with Kitsap County’s Great Peninsula Conservancy (GPC), we’re excited to launch a new monitoring study on our nature preserves in which we’ll be recording and analyzing birdsong.  Mapping the presence of certain indicator bird species will help us determine whether our forest management […]

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New Elementary School Bird Education Program Takes Learning to New Heights

Over the 2021-22 school year, Jefferson Land Trust expanded our youth education programming with an exciting new year-long bird project with three third-grade classes and two multi-age OPEPO (OPtional Education PrOgram) class of second, third, fourth, and fifth graders at Salish Coast Elementary School in Port Townsend. Birds are not only interesting and iconic, they’re […]

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Nature in Your Neighborhood On Demand: Resources, Recordings Available on our Website

Nature in Your Neighborhood is an online program developed by Jefferson Land Trust during the Covid-19 pandemic to help people in Jefferson County and beyond learn about our local flora and fauna from local naturalists and biologists. Now, we’re pleased to announce the opening of Nature in Your Neighborhood On Demand: a section on our […]

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“Taking Wing” Program Lifts Off

A recent study showed that nearly every bird species living in Washington’s forests and coastal areas is in decline, with particularly troubling declines in forest birds. Forest bird populations rely on a variety of coarse woody debris for shelter and sustenance including downed logs, standing dead trees, known as “snags,” and the large and/or old […]

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